Quick Jump Start Guide

Posted by Smart Motors | Posted in Automotive, Car Care, Car Maintenance, Driving, Service, Winter Driving | Posted on 18-12-2013

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Your vehicle’s battery is responsible for starting your vehicle, as well as powering a variety of electrical accessories. An alternator recharges your battery while the vehicle is running, but your battery may become drained for a variety of reasons, including extreme temperatures, leaving lights on, or simply old age. No matter what the reason, a dead battery can leave you stranded, and frustrated. If you believe the battery is the culprit of your car-starting woes, follow these simple steps for a successful jump start.

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1.     Park the booster vehicle close but not touching the vehicle that needs to be jumped. Once in position, shut off the booster vehicle.

 

2.     Begin the process by clamping one of the positive jumper cable ends (red) to the positive battery terminal (labeled with a “+” on the battery) of the dead vehicle.

 

3.     Connect the other end of the positive cable (red) to the positive battery terminal on the booster vehicle (again, confirm that a “+” is next to the battery terminal).

 

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4.     Connect the negative cable end (black) to the negative battery terminal on the booster car (marked with a “-“). Finally, attach the other end of the negative cable to an unpainted metal surface on the engine of the dead car.

 

5.     Start the booster vehicle and allow it to idle for about 1 minute before attempting to start the dead vehicle.

 

6.     Start the dead vehicle and let the two vehicles idle for a few minutes.

 

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7.     Once the dead vehicle is started and running smoothly, disconnect the jumper cables in the reverse order that they were connected.

 

8.     Drive the revived car to somewhere safe and secure before shutting off the engine.

Note: If the dead vehicle is not starting after  a few attempts, check all connections and reposition if necessary. You may also need to let the booster vehicle idle for up to 5 minutes while connected to the dead vehicle, in order to reach an adequate charge.

 

 

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How Fuel Cells Work

Posted by John Dolan | Posted in News | Posted on 11-12-2013

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Keep Loving Your Car

Posted by Smart Motors | Posted in Auto Body, Auto Glass, Automotive, Driving, Madison, News | Posted on 10-12-2013

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When consumers shop for their next car purchase they spend countless hours online, driving through lots, and garnering insights from friends, relatives and strangers. The goal, obviously, is to find the perfect car that will suit their needs and keep them driving happily for

IMG_0453years to come. Most dealers, and certainly we here at Smart Motors, aim to help consumers do exactly that; find the perfect car for them. However, as we all know, life happens, people change, and sometimes that dream car can become less than ideal. We take issue with that here at Smart Motors, and want to make sure you’re getting the most out of your vehicle, so you can continue to drive with a big, care-free smile.

 

Our loyal customers know that bringing their Toyota back to Smart for service is a great way to keep their vehicle running in tip-top shape, which certainly adds comfort and ease to daily driving. However, we strive to go beyond routine maintenance and complimentary carwashes, and really want to ensure that you like driving the car you’re driving. We have two dedicated Quality Assurance Managers who are positioned to aid customers who do find themselves lacking in love for their current chariot. Roger Ingalls and Chad Nettesheim, our Quality Assurance Managers, aim to please. It’s their goal, and a goal for all of Smart Motors, to make sure th

at our customers are driving happy. Chad says it’s as simple as asking customers, “Hey, how is everything going with your car? Is there anything you don’t like about it?” If the answer is, “Yes,” then odds are Chad and Roger can help with a solution.

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Whether there are small cosmetic blemishes that you find frustratingly unsightly, your car needs a serious deep cleaning, or the absence of modern amenities is getting you down, we’ve got options to satisfy. From our service drive and guest lounge, we’re ready to provide you with a variety of options to not only keep you car running great, but looking, feeling, and functioning just as well. We offer fixes for cosmetic body damage; including spot paint repair, paintless dent removal, and even glass repair or replacement. A full detail shop offers intensive cleaning inside and out, from upholstery steam extraction to waxing and buffing. Of course, if you’re looking to update your vehicle with roof racks, mud flaps, electronics and more, we offer a full line of accessories to help you customize and optimize your vehicle.

 

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Of course, if you don’t feel that your vehicle is suiting you well, and want to explore the option of a new vehicle entirely, our Quality Assurance team can take the hassle and frustration out of evaluating your current vehicle and finding new options that would be a good fit. With tools to provide information about equity, trade-in value, and cost calculation, we can easily assist you in making a smart choice.

 

As a company who genuinely cares about their customer’s satisfaction, Smart Motors does strive to go above and beyond to keep guests happy. Our Quality Assurance Managers are just another example of this, and help make Smart Motors a great place to purchase or service your vehicles.

 

If you need to contact our Quality Assurance Managers, you can email them with questions, comments, or concerns.

Chad Nettesheim at CNettesheim@smartmotors.com and Roger Ingalls at RIngalls@smartmotors.com

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Toyota FCV Fuel Cell Concept Moves Ahead

Posted by John Dolan | Posted in Automotive, Community, Driving, Events, Hybrids, News | Posted on 09-12-2013

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The annual Tokyo Auto Show is known for its edgy concept cars, but this year the show featured a ‘radical’ technology from Toyota that is scheduled to go into global production in 2015 — the Toyota Fuel Cell Vehicle (FCV) Concept.  

 

Although there have been reports that those of us in the United States won’t see it until much later, Toyota has hinted that it may make the FCV available in select regions of the country beginning in 2015.  The absence of a developed hydrogen fueling infrastructure here in the US remains a huge obstacle to adoption of this technology.  Yet, Toyota says it expects to sell a production vehicle based on the FCV in the United States, targeting areas where hydrogen fueling is available.  In all likelihood that means California where 10 of the nation’s 28 or so public hydrogen fuel stations exist.  Further, the California Fuel Cell Partnership has an action plan in place to develop 46 retail hydrogen fueling stations in six key California communities at a cost of about $180 million over the next four years; $60 million will come from industry and $120 million from government.

 

According to Catherine Dunwoody, CaFCP’s Executive Director, fuel cell vehicles are coming to California and the infra-structure needs to be in place, “By 2017, automotive manufacturers plan to place 50,000 zero-emission fuel cell vehicles in customer hands.  FCVs will provide the performance, durability, driving range, and comfort that customers want, and meet the nation’s need for a domestic fuel that is better for the environment”.  No one expects anything like this to happen over night, but the bottom line is that the funds have been allocated for more stations and there is a plan in place with future funding.  This funding is being justified by future demand allowing for additional expansion of H2 stations to meet the potential mass adoption of hydrogen-based vehicles.

 

Utilities in Japan have already started putting in more stations as part of a pilot program co-sponsored by Toyota.  For this reason, Toyota will initially launch the FCV in four Japanese cities — Tokyo, Chukyo, Kansai and Fukuoka during 2015.  From there it will come to Europe next, where there is a more developed H2 fueling network and to California and then possibly, Hawaii after that, targeting areas where hydrogen fueling is available.

Toyota is serious about hydrogen fuel cell cars and the development of its technology began in 1993 concurrent with the research and development on the Prius.  When Toyota

Rearfirst launched the gas-electric hybrid which has since become the industry standard, the response from the auto industry and mainstream America was pretty skeptical.  Through relentless engineering and continuous improvement and a solid three generations of the model, Toyota developed the Prius brand into a hybrid standard.  This is the company’s plan with hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

 

 

Fuel cell cars are basically extended-range electric cars — only a hydrogen-powered fuel cell stack serves as the range extender instead of a conventional internal combustion engine as in the Chevy Volt.  Toyota believes that this is the best solution to meet the future challenges of dwindling energy sources and increasing emissions.  A fuel cell vehicle produces zero emissions during operation and hydrogen is one of the more abundant elements around, although it needs to be extracted (separated) from others (such as H2O).  The hydrogen isolation process can be driven by energy sources such as natural gas, but solar energy would have the least environmental impact.  A hydrogen station, a storage or filling station for hydrogen, could be located along a road on the hydrogen highway, or in the home as part of the distributed generation resources concept.  A hydrogen highway is a chain of hydrogen-equipped filling stations and other infrastructure along a road or highway, such as the one the California Fuel Cell Partnership is developing.  Ultimately, a hydrogen highway would link states and countries.  Italy and Germany are collaborating to build a hydrogen highway between Mantova (Italy) and Munich (Germany).

 

 

Front Quarter

The Toyota FCV Concept that is making the rounds on the auto show circuit this season features it’s own fuel cell stack and a pair of high-pressure hydrogen tanks.  It is roughly the size of a Camry and has a range of around 310 miles per hydrogen fill-up.  Once the fuel stacks are depleted, it takes just three minutes to refuel.  Toyota says the FCV would also be capable of powering the average Japanese home for more than a week using the same amount of hydrogen.  Toyota is keen on developing home and even neighborhood fuel cell power in Japan where there has been a series of recent natural disasters.

 

According to a Toyota press release, the fuel cell stack of the FCV develops a peak power output of around 100 kilowatts

H2 TanksSide Quarter

(134 horsepower) but there is no mention of the output of the electric traction motors onboard the vehicle.  Toyota did mention that the FCV concept is equipped with a high-efficiency boost converter, which increases the voltage so the size of the electric motor  and the number of fuel cells could be reduced.  The result is a smaller system offering enhanced performance at reduced cost.  We can expect a top speed for the FCV to be at or just above 98 mph which was the top-end for the fuel cell Highlander test vehicle that successfully completed cold-weather testing during the 2,700 mile ALCAN Highway testing in 2007.  The 100kW output of the new FCV is more than twice that of the 2007 Highlander FCHV demonstration vehicle.  Although the fuel cell can deliver sustained power of 100 kilowatts, power delivery to the electric motor driving the front wheels is buffered through a lithium battery pack located under the specially designed body.  This allows the vehicle controller to alter power output quickly in response to acceleration and braking.

 

Front

The exterior styling of the FCV takes its design cues, says Toyota, from the operation of a fuel cell— conveying “the air-to-

water transformation (in fuel cells) with its flowing-liquid door profile and wave-motif fuel cap.”  The air and water themes are everywhere.  The large-mouth grille design typical of Toyotas these days, is beyond prominent on the FCV and symbolizes “taking in air”.  There are Prius cues in the roofline with a “floating roof” effect.  The FCV’s rear continues the “flowing water” theme and looks a little like the stern of a catamaran “emitting water” in its wake.  Even the color hints of water and air.

 

Toyota marketing executives are debating whether to include the upcoming fuel cell sedan into the Prius family.  The name “Prius” is loaded with marketing weight for both Toyota and its many customers.  The Prius is already a successful sub-brand with four models.  The “Hybrid Synergy Drive” power train branding will eventually be applied to every Toyota and Lexus.  More importantly, as a Toyota engineer mentioned nearly a decade ago at a training session prior to the launch of the Gen ll Prius, “Down the road, all we have to do with Hybrid Synergy Drive is take out the ICE (internal combustion engine) and replace it with a fuel stack and hydrogen fuel tanks and we have a fuel cell vehicle!”  Although not that simple, a fuel cell vehicle would fit right in with the rest of the family!

 

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